Seasonal Safety: Thanksgiving Tips for Pet Owners

By November 15, 2017Dog Tips

Turkey Day is right around the corner! Make sure your feast goes off without a hitch—and an emergency trip to the vet—with this guide.

The Food

This holiday is all about the food. Unfortunately, a sudden switch from kibble or canned food to a plate full of turkey and stuffing can wreak havoc on your pet’s digestive system, potentially leading to pancreatitis and gastroenteritis. More than just a tummy ache, these conditions can be very painful and even life-threatening to your pet.

Thanksgiving

Photo Credit: Christopher Schmidt

This does not mean your pet has to be left out of the festivities completely, however. The key is to keep it simple and in moderation. Remember, dogs and cats cannot handle rich, fatty foods like butter, cream and other seasonings the way humans can. It’s best to stick to small portions of plain turkey, mashed potatoes and vegetables like carrots or green beans. Make sure the turkey is well cooked and don’t forget to remove the bones and skin.

Keep in mind that while a little Thanksgiving meal will not harm your pet, there are a few foods that must be avoided. These include onions, grapes, raisins and chocolate, all of which are toxic to animals.

The Decorations

While home décor may not seem dangerous, some items can present a problem for our four-legged friends. Candles, in particular, should be kept out of reach of curious cats and dogs that can burn themselves or start a fire if the candle is knocked over.

Wires and batteries can also be hazardous. If chewed, wires can deliver a serious shock, while batteries can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus.

Cat Candle

Photo Credit: Sarah Ross

Other items, like decorative corn or pumpkins, may cause gastrointestinal upset or even a blockage if ingested.

The Clean-Up

Don’t think your pet is safe just because the food isn’t on the table anymore. One risk that is often overlooked is the disposal of food and wrappings when the big meal is over. It is safest to make sure all trash, including the turkey carcass, is securely tied up and out of reach. Remember that bones can break easily and sharp pieces can be swallowed, causing a blockage or tearing the intestines. All pieces of the carcass should be double-bagged and disposed of properly.

Food wrappings such as aluminum foil, wax paper and turkey strings should also be kept out of reach. Remember, when used to cook with, these items become just as irresistible to your pet as the food itself!

The Wind-Down

Make sure you give your pet a comfortable, quiet space to retreat to should the holiday activity be too much for him/her. Watch your pet for signs of stress, such as vocalizing, panting, pacing or trembling.